Chinese medicine has a lot to say about health and beauty. While acupuncture can be used to revitalize the skin and muscles of the face and body, nutrition is the best way to protect our looks. The combination of acupuncture and nutrition is the key to lasting beauty.

One of the biggest issues with aging gracefully is being moisturized. Lotions and cremes are helpful for the skin, but the food and drink that we ingest is more influential.

Without enough fluids in the body, we can feel tired, stiff, constipated, and hungry. Skin and tendons also tend to wither as the body dries out over time. It is not a coincidence that moist warm cereals such as porridge, grits, and farina have been staples for thousands of years. For many, soup is still a part of every meal.

These types of foods keep the body hydrated. Breakfast bars, coffee, carbonated sodas, pills, and powders are very drying to the body. As we age, using them as the center of our nutrition can make the skin drier and more leathery.

Our skin is called the third lung because air, heat, and water vapor pass through it constantly. The quality of a person’s skin says a lot about their health. It is important to remember that beauty, which is only skin-deep, doesn’t necessarily reflect good health. But good health will radiate beautifully from someone living a simple, healthy lifestyle.

In this world, there are countless advertisements for beauty and skin care. It is a multi-billion dollar industry and it isn’t new.  Ancient Egyptians tattooed their makeup on their faces thousands of years ago.

Attention to appearance is as old as civilization. Eat moist foods, avoid processed foods, and visit your friendly neighborhood acupuncturist to keep yourself looking and feeling your best.

Looking for more guidance on maintaining your health through holistic care? You can book your next session, available in person or virtually, right here. To learn more about the benefits of acupuncture, read more here.

About Rachel Strass

Dr. Rachel S. Strass, DOM, LAc, Dipl OM (NCCAOM) is a Doctor of Oriental Medicine and a licensed acupuncturist (LAc). She also completed the National Diplomate of Oriental Medicine from the NCCAOM (Dipl OM, NCCAOM) and holds two Master degrees: Acupuncture (MAc) and Oriental Medicine (MOM).

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